The History of Punk Rock

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The History of Punk Rock

Postby Nick F » Fri Mar 18, 2011 2:53 pm

...please, did it jointly evolve in the USA and UK or what? History, stories, photos and memories please...
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Re: The History of Punk Rock

Postby Eric Driver » Fri Mar 18, 2011 3:08 pm

Oh hoho. Don't get me started!

Read 'Please Kill Me' - it's all in there. Punk was a kind of arty minimalist beatnik sound coming out of New York in the mid-70s influenced by the great 60s garage thrash bands like The Sonics and The Monks and their ilk. Punk Magazine was where it began.

'Watch Out!
PUNK is coming!'

It gathered pace, changed form and went mainstream when the promoters realised that the UK's perpetually disaffected, angry and belligerent youth would go for it; the CBGB's bands were shipped over to be spat at all over the country, McLaren saw his opportunity and the rest is horrible history.

The spirit of punk died with designer punk clothing in the boutiques and Sham 69. The American bands couldn't understand why their kickass funtime music had become the sound of class warfare, though I'm sure they understood the financial eploitation.

Punk went from being a spirit of individualism to a uniform of subculture conformity in about six months.
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Re: The History of Punk Rock

Postby Jase » Fri Mar 18, 2011 3:12 pm

Heard this on Radio 4 the other week, about the French's influence on Punk Rock. You find it interesting.

http://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/b00yz3h8

And a text piece here

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-12611484
Last edited by Jase on Fri Mar 18, 2011 3:16 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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Re: The History of Punk Rock

Postby Nick F » Fri Mar 18, 2011 3:13 pm

I was just reading legs McNeil (?) interview!
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Re: The History of Punk Rock

Postby Eric Driver » Fri Mar 18, 2011 3:20 pm

That's the very dude!
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Re: The History of Punk Rock

Postby Nick F » Fri Mar 18, 2011 3:30 pm

Jase wrote:Heard this on Radio 4 the other week, about the French's influence on Punk Rock. You find it interesting.

http://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/b00yz3h8

And a text piece here

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-12611484


Certainly wouldnt kick her out of bed for spitting

[youtube]OxLx84_0dW8&feature=related[/youtube]
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Re: The History of Punk Rock

Postby crispy_nugget » Fri Mar 18, 2011 3:45 pm

from what im aware of

Punk = English
Punk rock = American

The punk as we know it today (the fuck authority stuff) is English
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Re: The History of Punk Rock

Postby no longer a member » Fri Mar 18, 2011 4:20 pm

The punk as we know it today (the fuck authority stuff) is English[/quote]
i wonder if we will get a new version of this


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Re: The History of Punk Rock

Postby Eric Driver » Fri Mar 18, 2011 4:28 pm

'I mean after all we were PUNK magazine. We had come up with the name and had defined punk as this underground American rock & roll culture that had existed for almost 15 years with the Velvet Underground, the Stooges, the MC5 etc etc.'
Legs McNeil - Please Kill Me

Whilst 'PUNK was coming!' in NYC we in London had our Pub Rock. This was the UK version of back-to-basics lowbrow rock and roll. Bands like Eddie and The Hot Rods, The Count Bishops, Dr Feelgood, The Hammersmith Gorillas, Graham Parker, The 101ers, The Stranglers, Kilburn and the High Roads, etc. When the Sex Pistols and The Damned produced their early take on the US sound the pub rockers took notice and some of them changed tack. What the UK did was to politicise and commercialise the basic stripped down garage punk rock 'n' roll. Punk seems like a UK phenomenon in hindsight because what had been an underground movement for so long in the US became exposed, exaggerated and exploited in the UK.

Johnny Rotten was the right man in the right place at the right time with the right attitude, if you liked that sort of thing, but right from the start he owed a massive debt to Iggy and The Stooges and all the great US bands that went before.

In England punk appealed to a lot of the hooligan element. Broadly speaking in the US it was more individualistic and nihilistic, whilst in the UK it was more tribal and took on elements of gang culture.
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Re: The History of Punk Rock

Postby DINO » Fri Mar 18, 2011 4:32 pm

fuck all that 70's pop punk commercial shite like the pistols,clash etc :evil:


these guys were about from 76 and their spirit still lives on today :twisted:
and no,punk ain't dead-just smells like it :wink:
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Re: The History of Punk Rock

Postby colt1664 » Fri Mar 18, 2011 4:52 pm

Jase wrote:Heard this on Radio 4 the other week, about the French's influence on Punk Rock. You find it interesting.

http://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/b00yz3h8


cool! merci :D
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Re: The History of Punk Rock

Postby ChrisK » Fri Mar 18, 2011 8:13 pm

Even though all my mates jumped on the band wagon, I never really got punk, nor ever really bought into it.
Not sure what relevance it really had in a NE of Scotland farming village! :lol:
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Re: The History of Punk Rock

Postby Eric Driver » Fri Mar 18, 2011 9:08 pm

Say how do you post up video on the forum here? I'm trying and failing to do the 'embedding' thing. Help! :oops:
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Re: The History of Punk Rock

Postby Nick F » Fri Mar 18, 2011 10:39 pm

post the full url and Ill show you, it depends on wgere its coming from you see; if you hovver over the lickle boxes above where you write text when you reply, it does tell you...
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Re: The History of Punk Rock

Postby Eric Driver » Fri Mar 18, 2011 11:23 pm

Cheers Nick!

[youtube]bMtk5Lor_0E&feature=related[/youtube]

The Sonics, 1964.

I listened to that BBC programme, thanks for the link Jase.
Marc Zermati is pretty clear on the point - Punk Rock as we know it began in the USA.

[youtube]WRuN2ayttsY&feature=related[/youtube]

The Stooges, 1970
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Re: The History of Punk Rock

Postby Thunder Toad » Fri Mar 18, 2011 11:58 pm

For Cliff Notes version of PuNk RoCk, just google Johnny Thunders.
Pretty much started there, got a boost from the PiSt0Ls in '76, died in about 1980.
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Re: The History of Punk Rock

Postby Eric Driver » Sat Mar 19, 2011 12:18 am

[youtube]jhwSHw5kpec&feature=related[/youtube]

Here's Johnny fronting the Dolls in 1973.
David Johansen looking hot in a nice frock too.

The punk/glam train wreck of The New York Dolls have their place in Punk history, and the two surviving band members are still making cracking records these days - the new album's just been released.

(embedding video! cool!)
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Re: The History of Punk Rock

Postby Eric Driver » Sat Mar 19, 2011 10:55 am

and here we are in 1974 - the heart and soul of Punk Rock: The Ramones.



Malcolm McLaren's seditious cultural ambitions wouldn't have been possible to advance so fast in the UK if not for the Ramones. Whilst McLaren was plotting to overthrow the establishment with designer anti-fashion and his self-conscious smash-it-up mentality the Ramones were busy just getting their kicks and rocking out. That's Punk.

The Sex Pistols were a deliberate assault of the mainstream and no matter that they were a kick-ass rock band the impression they made was overwhelmingly of violence and negativity. The Ramones on the other hand were just a bunch of kids who played rock and roll fast and loud, with a fresh stripped down careless attitude which reflected the truth of a grim situation in a bankrupt city.

Punks didn't want to change the world. Punk couldn't give a shit. Punk was anti-politics and anti-fashion.

The very early days of Punk in the UK saw kids wearing beat up clothes, sneakers and jeans - beatnik/hippy style - pursuing freedom from fashion and conformity, expressing individualism, just like in the US. This was in the months before the media latched onto the Sex Pistols, or the Sex Pistols latched onto the media. When that happened (via McLaren's best efforts)pretty soon the UK gang culture and the need to belong and to conform took over and a 'punk rocker' became recognisable in a uniform of safety pins, tartan and flags. This was when the original Punk philosophy and aesthetic went completely awol in the UK.

'No Future!' or 'Gabba Gabba Hey!' ????

The Ramones were the essence of Punk.
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Re: The History of Punk Rock

Postby Thunder Toad » Sat Mar 19, 2011 12:14 pm

Your vids are awesome, Eric.
From a Yanks perspective, the Ramones hit and we didnt know wht to think about them. A total 'w T f ?!?!' moment for us. But we got it aftr a listn or two and the rest is history. Ive seen the Ramones more than any other band. I worked for a band that opened fro a lot of one-hit-wonder bands that came through our area in '80-'83. We opened fro the Ramones a few times. Very decent guys. I remember Joey playing pinball with the regular people. He had to be 7' tall so he was always easy to spot, just walking round. Very cool. As for the PiSt0Ls, we didnt get them til later. Its almost like our press and radio tools conspired to keep them away from us at first. We had CREEM mag that showd them but hipster/posuer stuff like RollingStone wouldnt touch them with a barge pole. We knew about them, but in the age of no internet and lamo AOR radio, it was inpossible to hear them. When I finally did hear them, it was a dopey FM DJ goofing on them. He says "Listen to this crap that the Brits are calling music now" and plays about 30 seconds of Anarchy in the UK. In that 30 seconds, I had a religious epiphany. REally, it was the MOST fabulous sound I had ever heard. It was what I was waiting for but didnt know it. I was able to locate the album and it stayed on my turn-table for about 3 weeks before t got a break. Back then , our FM radio was all lamo, laid back california music like the 'Dead, Eagles, Journey etc...shit they played at Holiday Inn lounges and such... So to hear the PiSt0Ls come out at that time, it was truly HUGE. I saw the Clash too, in Philly PA, awesome show....First time I saw what the punk culture was n person, some scary violent stuff. I never saw the PiSt0Ls but did see Jones next band, the Professionals and I have to say it was one of the worst shows Ive ever seeen. I was very dissapointed. I guess punk is where you find it, and its stupid to say "Punk is dead" but as a musicin, music appreciator , my opinion is that nothing has equaled the fury of the '77 era bands and sound.


..:::EDIT:::.. oo000oof, sorry about spelling, 6:00 am over here :cry:
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Re: The History of Punk Rock

Postby Eric Driver » Sat Mar 19, 2011 1:10 pm

Cool to read that Thunder.

I took my new copy of the Ramones first LP into school and the other kids just laughed at me. They were all into Yes and Uriah Heep, Led Zep and Jethro Tull.
"But the songs all sound exactly the same!"
"YES! That's the WHOLE POINT!!" Haha.

I saw some bands in 77 but I lost interest as the media-fuelled youth-craze conformity took over in the UK and it all seemed to get ugly and angry and turned into a new fashion. I'd seen mainly UK bands - Stranglers, Users, Police, Adverts, Feelgoods, Hot Rods, Damned, Ultravox, etc. but not The Sex Pistols. The Ramones were I think the only US band I saw, apart from the solo Iggy in late 77 (and ex-Warhol Superstar Cherry Vanilla).

I preferred looking over from the Ramones to Television, Patti Smith, Suicide, and the whole 'Punk is Coming!' goofball artsy NY scene. I hated all that 'Borstal Breakout' right-wing football yob music that so-called UK Punk turned into. I wanted the romance of Punk (Beatnik-Punk!) and I listened to a lot of The Modern Lovers, Talking Heads, early Blondie of course, Suicide, The Dictators, New York Dolls, and most importantly The Stooges, and also the Velvet Underground.

Someone said as soon as Punk was given a name and became a genre then it wasn't punk anymore. Then it was just a bandwagon and a fashion, and a opportunity for exploitation, and boring copy-cats.

But look at what else was going on in Detroit in 1974!!
These guys never had a deal because they flat refused to change their name and no record company would touch them.
Now that's punk!

[youtube]OwehxN2ipCU&feature=related[/youtube]
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Re: The History of Punk Rock

Postby Thunder Toad » Sat Mar 19, 2011 1:52 pm

Ive watched a few of the Death vids on youtub. I never heard of them then, but they are fantastic !!
'74 in the USA, Black guys playing that ?!?!? I understand why we never saw or heard of them.
We weren't the most open minded country back then. Your version of punk from your side is
always interesting for me to read about and compare to what it was over here. We have very
different perception of bands, I would imagine. I first heard the 'Dolls in '72 and quite frankly,
as a little kid, the album cover scared me Really ! I saw it as very creepy, but something kept
making me put it on the turn table. I loved the Stones though, and thought these guys were
like the 'Stones but in a ruffer sort of way, meaning 'good'. After that, and the Pist0ls/Ramones
epiphany, my search for great music sort of mirrored yours as stated in your previous post.
I found a lot of great music in all diverse forms..... Jonathan Richman, Jesus and Mary Chain
and one of my all time favorites, the Jim Carroll Band. The Heartbreakers were my go-to
band for a long time. I realize Television isnt everyones cup o tea but I saw them in New York
in 2004 and it was mesmerizing. Musicianship and song interpretations that were incredible.
Still can never get enuff Johnny Thunders ! Absolutely love the Dead Boys,
Not a big fan of the Anti-Nowhere League, however... :D
If you haven't seen the Ramones 'Rock and Roll High School' movie I would recommend seeing
it as soon as you might attain a copy. Its very funny, at least I think so. Sort of Punk Rock Benny Hill(??)
slapstick but they really nailed American culture back then in a sort of life-imitating-art, way.
That era was their commercial comeuppance but its still all good.

Im sure you have seen it, but I will ask anyway, Rock and Roll Swindle ?? I thought it was
hilarious. Steve Jones is way cooler than Mel Gibson :mrgreen:
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Re: The History of Punk Rock

Postby Eric Driver » Sat Mar 19, 2011 3:13 pm

I introduced my teenage girlfriend to the New York Dolls albums and the cover photos scared her too! :lol:

'Rock and Roll Swindle' I don't care for as much as 'The Filth and the Fury'. Don Letts made a collage documentary called 'The Punk Rock Movie' which is interesting for the London scene. He's done another called 'Punk Attitude' which I haven't got around to watching yet but which looks good - from the Velvet Underground thorough to Bad Brains via Suicide, The Damned, The Buzzcocks, Black Flag, Dead Kennedys, etc.

I really liked 'New York Doll' for the moving story of Arthur 'Killer' Kane (surely the scariest of all the guys on those Dolls album covers!); 'End Of The Century' for the insight into the stresses within The Ramones (which the boys just played through regardless like the stormtroopers they were); and 'The Filth and the Fury' for the straightening of the record re McLaren, and for Johnny Rotten's tears.

Yeah I didn't know about Death until recently. Likewise The Monks. These punk trailblazing radicals that went practically unnoticed by the general public, but who must have had a massive influence on everyone who saw or heard them at the time.

Here's The Monks from way way back in 1965.

[youtube]-5iI0__9S1c&feature=related[/youtube]
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Re: The History of Punk Rock

Postby Eric Driver » Sun Mar 20, 2011 12:30 pm

Right, time for some more Punk Rock.

In the mid-70s whilst the punk-aesthetic subculture was brewing up around CBGB's and Max's Kansas City in NYC (and acquiring the perfect joke-moniker 'Punk' - a name which looks ironic in hindsight but was spot-on at the time, in the sense of 'worthless' (being practically the same as 'priceless') - something was rocking in the UK which was its Brit equivalent - the sound of disaffected, primitive, energetic, in-yer-face, fast hard raw party music, aka Pub Rock. Rhythm 'n' Booze!

Pub Rock was solidly grounded in R 'n' B but with a proper punk attitude. It was an amazing time for bands and music and the punters when your local boozer might push back the tables and have some sweaty local thrash-blues combo raise the roof whilst everyone got plastered on a Saturday night. That's punk.

If there had been no McLaren/Westwood influence on what became 'Punk Rock UK' who knows what good stuff might have developed from the streets and the boozers, without the uniform fashions and the socio-political pretensions. In the early days of Punk Rock in the UK a lot of these bands were considered to be part of the movement, played on the same bills and attracted the same crowd.

So here's some Pub Rock by punk bands, or perhaps here's some Punk Rock by pub bands. Either way this was what punk musicians were doing in the UK before everything got blown out of the water, and all proportion, on The King's Road and in the media.

First up - Eddie and The Hot Rods, in 1977 - so Punk that their photo appeared in error on the back of the Damned's own debut LP, first pressing. Barrie Masters wears flared trousers. Punk.




The Count Bishops, 1975. Down and dirty! Speedballs, motorcycles. Punk.




The Hammersmith Gorillas, 1974, sounding like The Kinks delinquent punk cousins.




The Pink Fairies, 1976. Long hair was no disqualifier. It's all in the attitude. Punk.
This record always makes me want to smash something up. Aaaaargh!!!




The 101'ers, c.1975. This is Joe Strummer on unmistakably Punk vocals - before he saw the light at the Nashville Rooms in early 76 when the Sex Pistols were his support act. Just an old Chuck Berry number, but it's got 'punk' all the way through like a stick of rock.
There are parallels between the London squat scene (The 101'ers were named after the street number of the band's squat) and the cheap loft spaces for artists offered in NYC in the 70s when the city was broke. Maybe 'The Housing Situation' had more effect than anything! Everyone should squat at least once in their life.

[youtube]oEWJhQIsI-E&feature=related[/youtube]


Dr Feelgood, 1975. No question, Lee Brilleaux was The Godfather of UK Punk Rock.
R.I.P.










OI! TURN IT DOWN!!!! :lol:
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Re: The History of Punk Rock

Postby Nick F » Sun Mar 20, 2011 4:50 pm

Death, hell yes.
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Re: The History of Punk Rock

Postby Eric Driver » Mon Mar 21, 2011 11:55 pm

Punk guitar heroes, all gone now.

Image

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Re: The History of Punk Rock

Postby SNAKEBITE » Tue Mar 22, 2011 8:01 pm

I grew up around punk.
My sister is older than me but I remember her taping Top of the pops on here casstte recorder and telling me off for being loud!
All the posters on her wall and the way she dressed left a lasting impression.
I was only 6 in 1977!
The attitudes were all changing, the boudries being pushed. I can really remember that despite being so young, sounds weird but you could feel something wasn't right anymore.

Moving onto my teenage years I rediscovered punk for myself and enjoyed it but only as an aside to my true love of Psychobilly!
Now that's a whole different story.................
Is this where I am supposed to write something witty?
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Re: The History of Punk Rock

Postby Eric Driver » Wed Mar 23, 2011 2:19 pm

Perhaps the rise of psychobilly-cowpunk-retrorockabilly-punkabilly-etc in the early 80s was a reaction to the angst and bitterness (and some right-wing tendencies) of what Punk had become, to get back to something more basic, less manipulated, less political and more fun.

Back to good time brainless gabba-gabba rock and roll. Music for the kids, sexy, delinquent, and cool again.

[youtube]KPNO5f4yO_g&feature=related[/youtube]

[youtube]BB7YhbM4K80&feature=related[/youtube]
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Re: The History of Punk Rock

Postby SNAKEBITE » Wed Mar 23, 2011 8:42 pm

Eric Driver wrote:Perhaps the rise of psychobilly-cowpunk-retrorockabilly-punkabilly-etc in the early 80s was a reaction to the angst and bitterness (and some right-wing tendencies) of what Punk had become, to get back to something more basic, less manipulated, less political and more fun.


Nah, way off mate.

Psychobilly was as a reaction against the soft "pink cadillac" Rockabilly that was around at the time.

The Meteors, who basically invented the genre sang about the stuff that interested them. Death, horror movies and other nastiness!
The other bands who play a similar type of music sprang up as a result of the Meteors.
(There are other bands that had a sort of comparable style such as The Cramps but The Cramps were never Psychobilly, even Lux said they were never Psychobilly)

Politics and Psychobilly have never and will never mix, the same with Religion.

The punkier side of Psychobilly came a bit later, losing the " 'billy" side of things and concentrating on the shoutier side of things.



[youtube]qdNQduEMj7Q&feature=related[/youtube]

[youtube]60wBpKKdwx0&feature=related[/youtube]

They have been going for 30 years now and they haven't slowed down one bit!!
Is this where I am supposed to write something witty?
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Re: The History of Punk Rock

Postby Eric Driver » Wed Mar 23, 2011 11:28 pm

YEAH!!!

I saw Guana Batz once at The Fridge in Brixton in 83 or 84. Mostly what I remember is sweat, chicken feathers and being bloody knackered by the end of it all.
Great that The Meteors are still putting it about. What else can you do??!!
:twisted:

I'm a bit shaky on the distinctions - cowpunk, rockabilly, thrashabilly, trashabilly, punkabilly, surfabilly, gothabilly, psychobilly, technobilly...
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Re: The History of Punk Rock

Postby Thunder Toad » Thu Mar 24, 2011 1:47 am

Eric Driver wrote:YEAH!!!

I saw Guana Batz once at The Fridge in Brixton in 83 or 84. Mostly what I remember is sweat, chicken feathers and being bloody knackered by the end of it all.
Great that The Meteors are still putting it about. What else can you do??!!
:twisted:

I'm a bit shaky on the distinctions - cowpunk, rockabilly, thrashabilly, trashabilly, punkabilly, surfabilly, gothabilly, psychobilly, technobilly...


To me, the Cramps are the alpha-band of most of the aforementioned '- -billy' genres.
When I first saw them, they actally scared me... Like a nitemare or bad B-Grade movie from the 60's come to life !
Fabulous stuff. The riffs, the sound... lyrics, everything is perfect.
I cant take time to find it right now, but there is a vid floating around of them playing a real mental hospital.
I didnt know whether to laff or be shocked(electro?) when I saw it for the first time. Great stuff !



Do you guys get your ears verbally punched when you try to explain to people Nirvana is NOT punk ?!?!?
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Re: The History of Punk Rock

Postby Eric Driver » Thu Mar 24, 2011 10:03 am

Haha. ...and how about Green Day and the like?



Bizarre scenes at the mental hospital.
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Re: The History of Punk Rock

Postby SNAKEBITE » Thu Mar 24, 2011 1:57 pm

Thunder Toad,

The Cramps were never Psychobilly, they influenced the sound of a lot of "Psycho" bands and the image was copied as well but Lux tried to distance himself from the Psycho scene. He always said they were not Psychobilly.

However I am a great fan of theirs and love the music, it doesn't matter what is in a "scene" or not, listen if you like it!

Eric,

There was a lot "Insert name here" billy genres around at one time. Then as the scene began to shrink they just all became "Psychobilly" again.
It just depended on what they sounded more like, country sounds became "cowpunk" etc etc.

Too many labels.

"Only the Meteors are pure Psychobilly" is a slogan from the band and is, as far as I am concerned true.
There are the Meteors and there are bands that play similar types of music.
Sounds a bit "snobbish" but hey ho, can't be perfect. :mrgreen:
Is this where I am supposed to write something witty?
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Re: The History of Punk Rock

Postby Eric Driver » Fri Mar 25, 2011 3:50 pm

Sounds spot on. 8)

Thought for the day - Gaye Advert. Punk Goddess.

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Re: The History of Punk Rock

Postby SNAKEBITE » Fri Mar 25, 2011 8:27 pm

Good choice.
Is this where I am supposed to write something witty?
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Re: The History of Punk Rock

Postby Thunder Toad » Sat Mar 26, 2011 2:31 pm

Some more cool stuff.....
I like these guys. They were big in the original CBGB's scene.
Handsome Dicks fight with Wayne County after Waynes change to Jayne, in which he
got clobbered from making 'queer' jokes was legendary.




Sheer awesomeness !!!
Doesnt get anymore badazz than the Dead Boys




More great American stuff.
This was the only California punk I could really get into.
The Circle Jerks/Germs/Fear/ DK sound never did it for me.

Produced by Steve Jones, too ! *w00t*

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Re: The History of Punk Rock

Postby Eric Driver » Sat Mar 26, 2011 8:23 pm

We used to do a version of 'Sonic Reducer'. Sniffin' Glue said 'here's 3 chords - now go and form a band.' We weren't any good on our instruments, but then that was supposed to be an advantage, and we never had more than about 20 mins of material, playing as fast as we could, but doing the school discos and parties with 2 or 3 other local bands it was enough. For an encore we just repeated the last thing we'd played, only faster. :lol:
Being in a band was cool, Punk was an opportunity. 'Young, Loud and Snotty' indeed.
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Re: The History of Punk Rock

Postby vato kat » Sun Mar 27, 2011 8:16 pm

Eric Driver wrote: Sniffin' Glue said 'here's 3 chords - now go and form a band.'


I always liked Phil Oakey's quote: 'We didn't even bother to learn three chords. We just used one finger'.

But back to the 'punks'... can't mention the New Yorkers without the No Wavers and other associated acts.









Better acknowledge this bloke too:

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Re: The History of Punk Rock

Postby Eric Driver » Mon Mar 28, 2011 8:40 pm

'We didn't even bother to learn three chords. We just used one finger'.

That reminds me of the Buzzcocks' 'Boredom' with its fantastic 2 note guitar solo.

"Boredom, boredom... ...ba'dum ba'dum" 8)
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Re: The History of Punk Rock

Postby Thunder Toad » Wed Mar 30, 2011 1:50 am

"One Finger"

When writing my own tunes I tune to Open D to work out a basic melody.
Thats a real 1-finger tuning, ha ha ...
You can play any song jut by moving your finger here and there 8) w~
After about an hour of that your finger feels like it just suffered a Russel Brand
movie marathon, tho... :x :cry: :oops: :@~
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Re: The History of Punk Rock

Postby Eric Driver » Wed Mar 30, 2011 9:20 am

Simplicity was definitely an important aspect of the iconoclasm of Punk.

M. Davies of the MC5 on The Stooges, c.1969 - "They didn't really know anything. All they knew what to do was to get onstage and be very interesting. When we listened to them playing we were like 'what are these guys doing? They really don't know any songs, and the music they're playing is so ridiculously simple' but there was something really charming and straight to the point about it. It was so rudimentary that it was great."

Maybe the contemporary equivalent in terms of one-finger simplicity is the growing popularity of ersatz Delta Blues played on home-made CBG instruments - one string slide diddley bows and the like.
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Re: The History of Punk Rock

Postby Nick F » Wed Mar 30, 2011 4:30 pm

Eric Driver wrote:'We didn't even bother to learn three chords. We just used one finger'.

That reminds me of the Buzzcocks' 'Boredom' with its fantastic 2 note guitar solo.

"Boredom, boredom... ...ba'dum ba'dum" 8)


A mate of mine was a guitarist and we performed one song together once in a night club in Cornwall. Basically he thrashed a guitar to death while I 'sang' "I went down the road, what did I see? I saw two skinheads looking at me...what did I do, I gave em headbutts" at which point he would hit me on the head with the microphone (repeat to fade). I think it was even a cover ffs.

I was only 12 in 78 so Punk to me was red mohicans, tartan, zips and safety pins. From reading this and hunting around, it seems the US Punk was less complicated somehow. A mate of mine was into psychobilly too (bit later C82-85). It seems rock and roll has always thrown out variations in sound and fashion.

Im still realing about the French impact!
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Re: The History of Punk Rock

Postby monkeyfinger » Wed Mar 30, 2011 8:11 pm

I think your "headbutts" song was indeed a cover - from the legendary John Ottway, possibly with Wild Willie Barrett. Thanks for reminding me of the old stuff Nick !!!! John's and Wild Willie Barret's stuff, and indeed Attilla the Stockbroker are all well worth a listen.

It's all a bit of a haze, but google came up with this....

Went downtown for a cup of tea
And I saw two skinheads looking at me
I gave 'em headbutts (x4)

Walking on the beach in a force-ten gale
And I saw three hippies saving a whale
(Oh, I hate bleedin' hippies! So...)
I gave 'em headbutts
(Now they've gone back to India to get their heads together!)
I gave 'em headbutts (x4)

Went to see me mum, she was drinking gin
But it's me old man's gin, so I kicked her in
I gave her headbutts (x4)

Lots of people in a line
Waitin' for a number nine
Well, not me, I don't
I walk right up to the front
"Excuse me, are you jumping the queue?"
"No, I'm...butting in!"

Went to the doctor's for a pill
"Why was that, feeling ill?"
No, I got an headache!
I got an headache!
Too many headbutts
Too many headbutts

Went to see a band called Shakin' Spear
I gave the singer the old King leer
"Where hast thou been?" he spat
I went "Oi mate - stitch that!"
I gave him headbutts (x4)

Got involved in a head-on collision
With a tanker driver that wondered what hit him
I went through my windscreen...
Through his windscreen...
(There might have been another one in between/
He had double glazing....)
(And what did I give him?)
I gave him a headbutt!
I gave him headbutts (x4)

Met this feller really into sport
Fifth-hand karate, you know the sort
"Cor, d'you give him headbutts?"
"Yeah - just like that!"
I gave him headbutts (x4)

I give it...
Head - Butts!!!
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Re: The History of Punk Rock

Postby greywolf » Wed Mar 30, 2011 8:22 pm


Classic !!
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Re: The History of Punk Rock

Postby monkeyfinger » Wed Mar 30, 2011 8:23 pm

PS. That's also reminded me that one of the great things about 70's English punk was that everyone had a great name. We all know about Sid Vicious and Johnny Rotten, but there were loads eg.

Atilla the Stockbroker and Wild Willie Barrett as per my previous post
Polly Styrene
Wreckless Eric
Jilted John
Steve Ignorant
Captain Sensible
Dave Vanian
Rat Scabies
Billy Idol
Animal
Adam Ant (yes- he was a punk at first)
Steve Strange
Lux Interior (OK he was American)
Jello Biafra and Klaus Fluoride from the Dead Kennedys (again American, but I saw them in the Fulham Greyhound so they're honorary Brits!
Richard Hell
Siouxsie Sue
Jah Wobble

Streewth I'm on a roll now. Probably wake up in the middle of the night with a few more to add.
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Re: The History of Punk Rock

Postby monkeyfinger » Wed Mar 30, 2011 8:31 pm

Just remembered the excellent mickey-take punk band - ALBERTO Y LOST TRIOS PARANOIAS

They recorded these two minutes of pure brilliance (NOT work/family friendly !!!) :

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Re: The History of Punk Rock

Postby Eric Driver » Wed Mar 30, 2011 9:03 pm

Plastic Bertrand. ?
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Re: The History of Punk Rock

Postby monkeyfinger » Wed Mar 30, 2011 9:11 pm

Good call old bean.

He's Belgian but we'll let you off :D
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Re: The History of Punk Rock

Postby Eric Driver » Wed Mar 30, 2011 9:45 pm

Yeah I wasn't going to mention it. :lol:

Also:

Sue Catwoman
TV Smith
Johnny Thunders
Tenpole Tudor
Elvis Costello
Handsome Dick Manitoba
Ari Up
Niagra
Buster Bloodvessel
Stiv Bators
Sylvain Sylvain
Cheetah Chrome
Rock Action
Iggy Pop

must be more to come...
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Re: The History of Punk Rock

Postby monkeyfinger » Wed Mar 30, 2011 10:23 pm

yes we're definitely on a roll now.

Must object to Buster Bloodvessel though. He was a skinhead. Never the twain shall meet and all that jazz

Apologies to any skinheads especially large ones :D

What am I saying?!? You skinheads can stick your 10 hole oxbloods up your botties. That's better. Far more punk.
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Re: The History of Punk Rock

Postby Eric Driver » Thu Mar 31, 2011 12:10 am

No arguments from me, you're right Mr Bloodvessel was a big fat skinhead teenybopper, like the Mr Blobby of the punk era. Not Punk at all. I remember him as the commercial chart side of all that 'orrible 'Oi!' music that came after punk.

Punk spawned New Romantics and Industrial and Psychobilly in all its variations, and Oi! music too. There was quite a lot of skinhead stuff about for a while and it had its right-wing element. Remember the lapel badges 'Nazi Punks Fuck Off' - and the Rock Against Racism movement of course.

I just thought of The Rezillos/Revillos - they had a taste for silly names - you had your Fay Fife (from Fife), Gale Warning, Johnny Terminator, Max Atom, Rocky Rhythm, Simon Templar, William Mysterious and Hi-Fi Harris, at various times. They're still at it I think.
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Re: The History of Punk Rock

Postby Thunder Toad » Thu Mar 31, 2011 1:05 am

Eric Driver wrote:Punk spawned New Romantics and Industrial and Psychobilly in all its variations, and Oi! music too. There was quite a lot of skinhead stuff about for a while and it had its right-wing element. Remember the lapel badges 'Nazi Punks Fuck Off' - and the Rock Against Racism movement of course.


That came a little later for us. Only the true devotees got '77 punk. Here, the Cali sound brought with it the violence crazed knuckledraggers who could f*** up a show quicker than a vanload of cops. For us, the skin assault started in the early 80's.
Red Laces, army surplus stuff.... :@~
I personally was ever disappointed when our scene started to evolve into that of "Decline of Western Civilization" type stuff, everywhere. Not my cuppa tea. It seemed almost cartoonish after the original ferocity of the '77 stuff.
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Re: The History of Punk Rock

Postby Eric Driver » Thu Mar 31, 2011 9:46 am

:idea:
Poison Ivy
Joe Strummer
Lydia Lunch
Gene October
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Re: The History of Punk Rock

Postby Nick F » Thu Mar 31, 2011 11:08 am

Tenpole Tudor, whatshesaying?


Sounds like Vic Reeves :lol: :lol: :lol:

[youtube]9udxbvHiqGw&feature=related[/youtube]
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Re: The History of Punk Rock

Postby Nick F » Thu Mar 31, 2011 11:16 am

Anyone listen to any Oz punk bands? When I was about 22, I was really into Hoodoo Gurus, they had a bit of a punk background

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Re: The History of Punk Rock

Postby Eric Driver » Thu Mar 31, 2011 3:40 pm

I bought the first single by The Saints 'I'm Stranded' - what a great record.

There was a lot of fuss about them in the NME and the pages of Sniffin' Glue - I liked the way they looked like slobs and they had long hair. Radical! In 1977 it was getting snobby - ie long hair = hippy/B.O.F. and all that, safety pins were a signifier... blah blah. The Saints looked like they were already beyond all that nonsense. They looked like pre-'Punk' punks, more like The Pink Fairies. Anyway, they kicked ass.

Then there was The Birthday Party...

Midnight Oil were a great Australian band, not the same music but perhaps the activism puts them up there with the politico-punks like MC5, Dead Kennedys, etc. Not really sure about the Clash, politically, I mean Strummer never actually either stood for election like Biafra and Garrett, or called for revolution ('total assault on the culture by any means necessary, including rock 'n' roll, dope and fucking in the streets') like the MC5.

Do politics and punk mix? Hmmm... that's where the Oi! stuff came in in the UK. Punk seemed to go more easily rightwards than leftwards, although the whole ethos was ultra-libertarian it was the anarcho-fascists who seemed to get most mileage.

Maybe the simultaneous rise of reggae (and then ska) was a backlash to the rightest/racist tendencies or maybe it was just a happy coincidence.
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Re: The History of Punk Rock

Postby Nick F » Thu Mar 31, 2011 3:49 pm

Hm, Midnight Oil were right up there during my Oz rocker period but Id never think of them as punk. Did Punks really have an agenda?
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Re: The History of Punk Rock

Postby Eric Driver » Thu Mar 31, 2011 4:10 pm

No I didn't mean Midnight Oil were punk, I was just thinking about Aussie bands in general, and that got me thinking about politics.

The Punk agenda for me was summed up in 3 words - 'Gabba Gabba Hey!' %$
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Re: The History of Punk Rock

Postby Eric Driver » Thu Mar 31, 2011 5:13 pm

I shouldn't have put Tenpole Tudor on the name list. Error. !

The band was Tenpole Tudor, the frontman was merely Edward Tudor-Pole, an ex-public schoolboy who got mixed up with McLaren and the Sex Pistols, had one hit - 'Swords of a Thousand Men', and went on to appear in films and stage musicals and present The Crystal Maze on TV. He seemed a lot more akin to Adam Ant and the New Romantic Panto-shtick than he did to Punk Rock.
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Re: The History of Punk Rock

Postby Eric Driver » Fri Apr 01, 2011 11:58 am

How could I forget Radio Birdland? Maybe Australia's finest.
Here they are in 77 doing what The Stooges do best.
Longhaired punks.

Funny to see the TV studio audience dancing politely to this onslaught.

[youtube]Ky7UdRbKZ3Q&feature=related[/youtube]
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Re: The History of Punk Rock

Postby Eric Driver » Sat Apr 02, 2011 11:47 am

Another couple of cool punk names - from 1974's Rocket From The Tombs -

'Johnny Blitz' and
'Crocus Behemoth'

:lol:
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